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The area bordering waterways, such as riverbanks, is known as the ‘riparian zone’. The presence of native trees and vegetation in this zone is important to the stability of the riverbank, water quality and native fish populations.

OzFish delivers many riparian restoration projects across Australia – working with local communities and organisations to create healthy habitats and lasting legacies.

Trees for Fish Projects

Coldstream River – Stage 2, NSW

Coldstream River – Stage 2, NSW

OzFish, landholders, and volunteers rejuvenated Coldstream River, removing 500m of weeds, planting 1000 natives, enhancing fish habitat, and fostering community engagement for a healthier ecosystem.

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Maguires Creek, NSW 2024

Maguires Creek, NSW 2024

This project will restore 250m of riparian vegetation along Maguires Creek. Helping to improve habitat, and bring back some of the ‘Big Scrub’ for Australian Bass, Herring and Mullet that all love this creek to enjoy!

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Burringbar Creek, NSW 2024 

Burringbar Creek, NSW 2024 

Oz Fish are working with the community to remove invasive weeds and plant out natives along a 200m stretch of riparian zone to improve habitat for Australian Bass and other native fish that love this Creek.

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Clarence River, NSW 2024

Clarence River, NSW 2024

Members of the OzFish Clarence River Chapter will work with volunteers from Clarence Valley Landcare to plant native trees along a section of the riparian zone at the Junction of South Arm and the Clarence River after a private contractor has removed exotic weeds.

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South Creek, NSW 2024

South Creek, NSW 2024

At South Creek, OzFish members, landcarers, and local community will work together to clean up flood debris at the site, remove invasive weeds, and help replant native vegetation. These work will commence once the site has been fenced off to exclude grazing cattle. 

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Rocky Creek, NSW 2023

Rocky Creek, NSW 2023

Oz Fish has been working to restore 650m of riparian zone along Rocky and Little Rocky Creek to improve the habitat for native fish species.

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Nymboida River, NSW 2024

Nymboida River, NSW 2024

OzFish Unlimited has restored 7 hectares along the Nymboida River. Hosted two community engagement and educational days, brought volunteers together to plant 1000 native trees to increase resistance and resilience to fire and flooding on the riparian zone.

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Talbragar River, NSW 2023

Talbragar River, NSW 2023

The Dunedoo-Coolah Landcare Community Event successfully engaged the public in planting native trees and hosting a fishing clinic for children along the Talbragar River as part of an initiative to restore the river's ecosystem and improve habitats for native fish and wildlife.

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Nepean  River, NSW 2023

Nepean  River, NSW 2023

OzFish Hawkesbury Nepean Chapter, Wallacia progress Association, Penrith City Council and the Hawkesbury Nepean Landcare Network aim to restore a popular section of the Nepean riverbank in Wallacia and hold a responsible fishing event to educate participants on eco-friendly fishing practices.

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Hunter River , NSW 2023

Hunter River , NSW 2023

OzFish Unlimited, and partners propose to restore two degraded stretches of the Hunter River through riparian restoration and re-establishment of large woody fish habitat. The project will involve multiple community planting and education events, fish hotel building workshops, and citizen ...

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Bonville Creek, NSW 2023

Bonville Creek, NSW 2023

In partnership with Coffs Harbour Regional Landcare, the OzFish Coffs Harbour chapter got together on a rainy afternoon to repair a local wetland to support native fish. Activities on the day included the removal of environmental weeds, the planting of 150 native trees and the removal of ...

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Nymboida River, NSW 2023

Nymboida River, NSW 2023

OzFish Unlimited has restored 3 hectares of the riparian zone along the Nymboida River following the devastating 2019-2020 Black summer bush fires that burnt throughout the system. Removal of privet, lantana and other exotic weeds has been undertaken to reduce competition with native plants. ...

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Why are native trees so important to the health of rivers?

Native trees have root structures that either bore down or spread out, creating intricate and strong foundations that help maintain the structural integrity of riverbanks. Without roots anchoring the bank together, it is more likely to collapse.

Eroding banks cause significant negative impacts on fish habitat, including removing overhanging vegetation that provides food and shade to fish in the river. The sediment they create also smothers snags and shelter spots, as well as causing water quality issues.

 

 

Riparian zones are sometimes referred to as biofilters, as they remove excess nutrients, pollution and sediment from water before it enters the river. An excess amount of nutrients can result in the growth of algae and algal bloom, which takes oxygen away from fish.

Trees bordering rivers also provide an important source of food and shelter for fish.

They create shade corridors, enabling the fish to move more freely for activities such as mating, and insects that drop from overhanging branches provide food.

OzFish is also involved in the removal of invasive weeds and vegetation, before replacing them with native trees and plants. Invasive species can be very harmful to an area, including contributing to drought by absorbing more water than the area can sustain to lose.

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We all have a role to play

There are many factors that contribute to the damage of riparian zones, many of them caused by humans. This includes grazing and trampling by livestock, gravel extraction for use in construction, and the creation of paths close to the riverbank, that result in native vegetation being removed.

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So, please get involved in one of our many ‘Trees for Fish’ projects across Australia. By volunteering for a few hours and planting some trees, you’ll be doing your bit to combat erosion of the riverbank, provide food and shelter for native fish, and ensure that the future of fishing in your area is sustainable.

Strong, stable and healthy riverbanks provide better access to the water. Water which will be of better quality and home to more fish.